Francesca Camino by Andrea-Marino
21 JULY 2017

Touching Moments Inside The Studio

Touching Moments Inside The Studio
by Catalin CROITORU

Copyright to Andrea Marino© All Rights Reserved

Francesca Camicia, Model by Andrea-Marino
Copyright to Andrea Marino© All Rights Reserved

A model in the fashion industry. And a highly rated photographer.
The two of them had met at a dinner and because of a divine principle. And ever since the model and the artist became a source of inspiration for each other, a “bouquet” of emotional moments shared between the two persons.
Francesca Camicia, an Italian model that lives in California, U.S.A., bonded with Andrea Marino, an Italian photographer living in California too; that happened in a split of a second, but what was next lasted for years. Lens Magazine brings the emotional and the amazing story of the two into its pages. You will make aquaintance with Francesca, a woman that was trapped until few years back into a male body, and with Andrea, the wizard that used a camera to make blooming the world around him.

 

Touching Moments Inside The Studio
– Between A Model and A Photographer –

Hello, Francesca! It is a pleasure to meet you! Please be so kind and introduce yourself for the readers of Lens Magazine.

I would like to introduce myself to the public. It is an honor to be featured in this magazine and to have the opportunity to share my story of life and my struggles and send a message to the world. I would like to start my story by saying thank you to Lens Magazine for sharing my story and giving me the opportunity to model for them. My name is Francesca Camicia, I am a British-Italian model. I am 22 years old and I will be 23 soon. I was born in Italy more precisely in Rome, and I grew up in Rome from an Italian dad and British mother. I have one brother and one sister. My brother is older than me and my sister is younger. My story is unique, special and complex because of my gender and my challenges in a society that hates diversity and doesn’t accept minorities. I went to high school in Rome and I graduated and then moved to London to start my bachelor degree in international relations and diplomacy for years. I studied at university in London and I was starting to feel that I had to make a change in my body because I always felt that I was born in the wrong body.

Francesca Camicia by Andrea-Marino

Copyright to Andrea Marino© All Rights Reserved

I began informing myself on how it would be possible to start my transition to becoming a woman even for my body not only for my soul. I searched and started the psychological tests for years to start my hormone replacement therapy and male blockers to start changing my shape. The changes were evident and my breast starting growing and I was starting to feel the way I always wanted to feel. My life was and has been very hard because of the difficulties that transgender women face such as discrimination, lack of equal rights and other elements. I continued to study and I was thinking that modeling was something I would have liked and while I was studying in London I was scouted by an agent in a boutique model agency. I started thinking that it would have been impossible to model or to be accepted the way I was in an agency because of the usual ideas of beauty. My model agent in London started believing in me and I was put on the agency website on both men and women section as a unisex model because of my androgynous look and beauty. I wanted to risk and try even though I knew I would have received a lot of hate and not acceptance.

Francesca Camicia, Model by Andrea Marino, Copyright to  Andrea Marino© All Rights Reserved

Francesca Camicia, Model by Andrea Marino, Copyright to Andrea Marino© All Rights Reserved

I wanted to show myself that I was equal and show the public that I was a model and I was capable as anybody else. I wanted to show the world that to be a model you can be who you really are and that your uniqueness is your treasure, not something to hide. I started to feel empowered because I was starting to feel that my life had a meaning and that I existed and the fact that I was visible being the only transgender model was a revolutionary act and it would have helped even other people like me to feel proud and not ashamed of what they are. I went to various castings and catwalks and many times I was discriminated and I felt powerless but I never lost faith. I was appreciated too by many people at the same time but the market was very limited because of the clients’ standards ideas of beauty. I continued to model for my boutique model agency in London and I wanted to do more surgeries to change my body and become who I always wanted to be. I traveled to Thailand in Bangkok and Italy and started doing various surgeries to change my body because the hormones were not enough. The pain was infinite but I had to make it.
I had no choice. I had to accept myself and my condition. After years of hormones, I have undergone sex reassignment surgery to finally become who I was: a woman. I was already a woman but that step to me was essential to carry on and live freely and without chains. The stress and pain and courage was a lot but I made it in the end.
When I finished my bachelor degree in the United Kingdom I moved to the United States in California and I continued studying law. I am now studying for my master degree in law in San Diego, California. I have traveled all over the world. I love traveling and knowing and seeing other cultures. People should learn that we are not labels but people and that the person should be judged by his or her actions, not for her gender or religion or race. The fashion industry is still very conservative and not very trans-friendly and still don’t accept transgender models or other models who have a unique look.
I hope this will change. I hope with my work and story to share awareness and to teach people that even a transgender woman can be a model or can be whatever she wants.
I am proud of who I am and I allow nobody to stop my dreams even though I have a harder life.
I love fashion. I love art. Art allows me to express myself. Art helps me to escape from reality and fashion is a way of art.

I wanted my body to be like a painting.
I wanted to express myself completely.
My family has accepted and supported me always all through my life but many families all around the world don’t accept LGBTI children and this is very sad and I hope that one day every family understand that being gay or transgender is not a choice. Happiness is a human right. Freedom is a human right. Denying to accept your own child because of what he or she feels is not right. I was very lucky. It takes time and it takes information to end ignorance. Schools have to teach that bullying is not acceptable and they have to promote equality. Society has to learn the lesson that hate kills transgender and gay people every day. I didn’t do anything wrong.
I studied law because I was curious about the laws regarding LGBTI people and I wanted to make a change. I love diversity. I love uniqueness. My inspiration was all those models that brought a different type of beauty into the fashion industry. I think that people should understand that love has no gender. Many men, unfortunately, don’t accept to be seen in public with a transgender partner and this is because the culture has put to shame and has destroyed the image of transgender women promoting hate and showing always negative aspects when we are actually just women like every other woman. I am myself not a label. I am Francesca. I am a human.
I can love or be loved by who I want.
We don’t have to put people in boxes. We must not divide people and even if people are different from each other they should hate each other. I hope people love me for who I am and for my beauty. Healthcare for transgender women it is not a choice it is essential. Transgender women are stuck in a body that is not what they are. Healthcare should be free and accessible to all transgender women. We need change. I had to fight especially in Italy to change my documents and passports into a female and I was so stressed out because they let you go through a very hard and long procedure to change your gender on your ID. All my struggles have made me stronger.

Read the Full Interview with Francesca Camicia on Lens Magazine Issue #34

Andrea Marino, Photographer

Andrea Marino, Photographer, Special Interview on Lens Magazine Issue #34

Touching Moments Inside The Studio
– Between A Model and A Photographer –

Andrea Marino, Photographer

Thank you, Andrea, On the behalf of Lens Magazine readers, for giving us some of your precious time by accepting this interview!
You have a long career in this form of Art named photography. Please tell us about it

Andrea Marino: understood, early on that pretty much everything is an image, yes a photograph branded in our subconscious or straight up in our conscious life… hence
the tremendous power that images hold. It was possibly consequential to that awareness that an almost absurd need to understand why images are so important to humans, and how they shape up our life and why we do oblige to that, was born. And of all images, of all photography, of course, fashion images, fashion photography. Yes, above all I chose early on to use fashion photography as a mean to understand or try to understand all that. Above all others forms of communication, fashion goes straight to the core of the human experience. I read somewhere a long time ago that the difference between the Neanderthal and the Homo sapiens namely when we transitioned from sub-humans into humans it wasn’t that the experts, the archaeologist found something big something monumental, it was actually the opposite they found something very small. The experts, the archeologists find something very small… buttons and what appeared to be brooches. They were used to adorn the skins that the Neanderthal wore….. now upgrade into a human by it. Yes, it was a fashion choice, an idea that made us human. I’m sure they would have consecrated the moment with a selfie but there were no cameras around back then… Pity! The need to appear bigger better more beautiful more powerful, important… fashion in a few words, is what has intrigued me and keeps my interest going. I use photography, fashion photography like a discovery tool. That keeps it always fresh.

Lens Magazine: What do you feel when you are in a studio and you have your camera in your hands, ready to shot fashion or glamor?
A.M.: Lately I’m rarely in a Studio. I come back full circle, if you will, I went back to shoot outside. I started shooting outside early on in my career through the streets of Milan. Even when I was shooting for Italian Vogue I preferred to shoot fashion outside, that inside a studio. I would take models and crew to Sicily to shoot editorials there…. so much raw nature there. ones I spent almost two weeks shooting for Bazaar Uomo there. So much soo that the headquarters in Milan thought I had been kidnapped and feared for the worst, we were in such a remote location that couldn’t communicate for days. I can get lost outside… Nature, for better or worse, is everything. When possible I try to use daylight, sunlight, even for images that may need to have a studio setting. I don’t shoot glamor anyways and honestly since the big switch from analog to digital photography I feel less at ease when I shoot there’s so much post production to think about while you’re shooting, that it’s almost impossible to enjoy the moment, like I use to.

Lens Magazine: In the 90s you abandoned for a while the high standards photography and you have traded it for a “less fashionable side of the World”; what exactly it meant?
A.M.: It was at the beginning of 2000 really when I started to itch for something radically new…. The self-obsessed and self-proclaimed first world, “The West”, got a bit tight all at ones, I needed a break from it all, and traveled for 2 to 3 years straight, mostly through southeast Asia and North Africa. I wanted to learn, to understand, to observe something not familiar… what I discovered was that I felt so much closer, almost at home, in India that I thought possible, I am still trying to understand how that came about. To feel immediately at home in a foreign country not close to your culture it’s really an incredible thing to experience.

Lens Magazine: You have a special relationship with one of your models – Francesca Camicia. You both are Italians but you are living abroad, a thousand miles away from your native land. How you two crossed your paths?
A.M.: We met at a great dinner with great food, which is always a good thing, and we hit it off immediately. I could see so much of myself in her and I think she felt the same…. not just because we are Italians but because as an artist as a person that has questioned everything since the get go in order to create something, you’re attracted to people that have done and do the same, I love that in Francesca. I think she loves that I am that way too. I love that fearless way of seeing things that she has. To see the way things are and not see things the way they seem, take a lot of questioning; without it, you’ll always get someone else’s version of perception of the truth. You’ll be a recycled being. Questioning everything it’s our duty, artistically and personally. Accepting everything is they way it is told you without questioning the validity and the truth of it is, in my opinion, madness.

Lens Magazine: The main theme of Lens Magazine next issue is “Emotional Moments”. Did you two – you and Francesca – had such “emotional” moments?
A.M.: Yes we did… you have to, otherwise there’s no magic in the images there’s no energy, and you always want to project that energy that message to the observer, the viewer, you need to leave a trace of what it meant to shoot that image…. what it felt like. Francesca was transitioning “while we were shooting” in between photo shoots and I think it is obvious in the message, in the energy of the pictures the message…. what Francesca and I wanted to communicate is that ultimately there’s no separation, There’s no before and after, there’s no fragmentation. The energy is one there’s no duality, it’s a divine principle.

Francesca Camicia, Model by Andrea Marino, Copyright to Andrea Marino© All Rights Reserved

Francesca Camicia, Model by Andrea Marino, Copyright to Andrea Marino© All Rights Reserved

 Lens Magazine: Franco Moschino, Anna Piaggi and Gianni Versace – just to name a few – are names with a significant importance in your career; when you look back now what emotional souvenirs come in your mind when you think of those names?
A.M.: Well, to call them, “emotional souvenirs” it feels a little reductive to me. They feel more like imprints to me if not full at times. When I think of Franco, grace under fire, comes to mind immediately, tremendous talent and a lot of humor too. Last time I saw Franco he was near the end, it was at the Triennale in Milano for a retrospective in his honor and although he knew the time was near he was graceful and a gentleman with everybody, uil the end Franco kept his sense of humor and love for everything and everyone. He sadly was one of the first high-profile victims of AIDS in Italy. A shocking premature departure for the most gentle and funny and giving and irreverent person I knew. He got me my first job in Fashion, assisting Fabrizio Ferri at Superstudio in Milan. What a brilliant man. I think of him often.

Francesca Camicia, Model by Andrea Marino, Copyright to Andrea Marino© All Rights Reserved

Francesca Camicia, Model by Andrea Marino, Copyright to Andrea Marino© All Rights Reserved

Gianni was the American dream personified. A humble beginning in Reggio Calabria all the way to Milano’s Palazzo Rizzoli. He bought the palazzo in two stages setting Milan society on fire, they hated him for the rest of his life because of it. You know right…. that people from the south in Italy are called Terroni, is like the N word in America, now imagine if you can…. this is 1970 Italy, that a Terrone went all the way, in a short span of time, from Reggio Calabria to conquer Milano extremely exclusive fashion society and replace an aging view of what the status quo was, the image of a perfectly and boringly dressed woman of course from Milan, with a new one that depicted an extremely outgoing and 1/2 naked glamorous lady, labeled a “whore” That was how it was described, the woman that he was trying to dress, from the many detractors. The success was instant. His clothes his image, unprecedented, like the enormous wealth that came with it…. and he wasn’t shy about flaunting. It is, like it or not, a tremendous accomplishment. I think he felt that people did not really appreciate the enormity of the achievement for that reason I also think that Gianni was not an easy man to get along with or an “instantly nice” guy for lack of a better word. There was always a tension around him. I remember that he complimented me ones though, on what I was wearing. It was after the end of a concert, backstage, his muse concert, Ornella Vanoni and he called me and complimented me, “Ciao, mi place cost hair a does! L’hai messo tu insieme?” “I Like what you’re wearing did you put it together” I had layers and layers of clothes…. and a pair of jeans that to say that they were torn was an understatement…. I was very nonchalant about it, I said thank you and went back to talk to my friend. I think he liked that. He liked it so much that the same style if not a replica of what I was wearing came out the following year on a spring/summer main collection, of all seasons. And because of it, I think, I was one of the very few to be allowed backstage with a camera after each of his fashion shows I shot… without getting yelled at and escorted out, like the few that tried. Oh… we also had a dear friend in common, hum yes, this thing definitely reminds me of a souvenir like sort of thing, if you will.

 

Read the Full Interview with Andrea Marino on Lens Magazine Issue #34

Francesca Camicia, Model by Andrea Marino, Copyright to Andrea Marino© All Rights Reserved

Francesca Camicia, Model by Andrea Marino, Copyright to Andrea Marino© All Rights Reserved

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Copyright to Oded Wagenstein © All Rights Reserved
20 JULY 2017

THE VOID WE LEAVE – ODED WAGENSTEIN Special Interview

– THE VOID WE LEAVE –

An Interview with ODED WAGENSTEIN
by Omri Shomer

Oded Wagenstein, Special Interview on Lens Magazine Issue 34

Oded Wagenstein, Special Interview on Lens Magazine Issue 34

Oded Wagenstein, A professional and unique photographer, while most of us photograph what we see Oded strives to capture emotions.

Hello Oded, Thank you for this Interview, Please tell us a bit about the project

The “Void we leave” is an ongoing project I started back in 2014 in Cuba and it tells the story of an aging community, living in an ancient town in the central part of the island.
For me, this project deals with one of the most absurd issues in our existence here – the thought that one day we will not be here, forever! Leaving only a void between two walls and some personal objects.

Please tell us what led you to photograph this special project?

Chance encounters with one of the members of this aging community that led me to take my first steps into their daily life. At first, I did not plan it would become a series of images or a photography project. I just liked the idea of spending time with those people and hearing their nostalgic stories. Only after a while, when I showed some of the portraits I took there (again, without any particular intention) to my friends back at home, I realized I might have a base for a story I want to tell.
Do you remember one special moment that moved you?
One of the first people I have met in this community was Delphin (dressed as a Captain). He lived in a small hut surrounded by icons of Lenin and Marx, And when I came to see him, I always felt like I was going back in time. Recently, I went to visit him again (as part of my regular visits to the community), but the hut was empty, and his brother told me Delphin passed away. The brother told me by taking his thumb and putting it around his neck in a cutting motion. I was in shock. I’ve seen a lot of friends passing away in this community, but I always thought that Delphine would live forever. Obviously, this is a stupid and incorrect thought. But that’s how I felt at that moment.

Copyright to Oded Wagenstein © All Rights Reserved

THE VOID WE LEAVE, An Interview with ODED WAGENSTEIN
by Omri Shomer.  Copyright to Oded Wagenstein © All Rights Reserved

Finally, after a while you walked into empty houses, these particular friends have passed away, with what fears you have confronted?

I do not know if confronted is the right word. I would prefer to use the word encountered. The fears I encountered. Again, it is not that I discovered that there is the death in this world, like a child who discovers there is no Santa Claus. It’s just the absolute meaning of not being here, forever. I think this is something the human mind can’t actually understand the word “forever”.

Read the full article on Lens Magazine Issue #34 

Copyright to Oded Wagenstein © All Rights Reserved

Copyright to Oded Wagenstein © All Rights Reserved

Copyright to Oded Wagenstein © All Rights Reserved

Copyright to Oded Wagenstein © All Rights Reserved

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Allan Kliger on Lens Magazine
19 JULY 2017

EMOTIONAL MOMENTS by Allan Kliger

EMOTIONAL MOMENTS
by Allan Kliger

Allan Kliger on Lens Magazine

Copyright to Allan Kliger © All Rights Reserved

Emotion – We all know what emotion is, don’t we? Or rather, we know what it looks like when we see it in someone else, and we know what it is when feeling it ourselves. There it is. That word. Feeling. It’s inextricably tied to emotion, to the emotive state.

Copyright to Allan Kliger © All Rights Reserved

Copyright to Allan Kliger © All Rights Reserved

Are they the same? Most dictionaries define emotion as a psychological state that arises spontaneously rather than through conscious effort, often accompanied by physiological changes. An instinctive state derived from one’s circumstance or relationship with others. In photography, it’s often what separates a great image from one that’s not. One that makes us stop, to study, to connect, to identify, to smile or feel pain, but in the end to feel something. To feel connected to the world around us. We are social creatures.

Seeing an emotional expression in another makes us feel. It brings us into that vignette, into that experience. Sometimes unwillingly, often by choice. It’s what I look for when I shoot. I want to feel alive, to feel alerted and aware of the world and it’s people around me and so when I see an expression of emotion I am driven to capture it. To freeze it forever. Perhaps to later relive being there, perhaps to kick start, like a jolt of current or caffeine, just for that moment, what it feels like to be alive. Sort of like when we’re healthy we can take it for granted because we don’t really feel anything, but when we’re feeling sick, only then do we know how good it feels to not be sick. To feel, to be in the space of another’s emotion, makes me feel, makes me appreciate, that I’m not simply a bag of bones but a sentient, spiritual being.

 

 

Read the full Article on Lens Magazine Issue #34

Copyright to Allan Kliger © All Rights Reserved

Copyright to Allan Kliger © All Rights Reserved

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Joel Meyerowitz Camel Coat Couple in Street Steam, New York City, 1975.
18 JULY 2017

JOEL MEYEROWITZ- SPECIAL INTERVIEW

SPECIAL INTERVIEW WITH
JOEL MEYEROWITZ
BY SEBI BERENS

 JOEL MEYEROWITZ Interview by Sebi Berens

SPECIAL INTERVIEW WITH JOEL MEYEROWITZ
BY SEBI BERENS

 

JOEL MEYEROWITZ Born in 1938,
New York, United States. Lives and works in New York, United States. With his career beginning in 1962 and with being famous for his complex compositions, you can be sure that the American color photography master, Joel Meyerowitz, knows how to act invisible on the streets. He has always seen himself as a street photographer in the tradition of Henri Cartier-Bresson and Robert Frank, the co-author of the standard work on the genre, Bystander: A History of Street Photography, Bulfinch Press, 1994. He transformed the mode with his pioneering use of color. Meyerowitz is an award-winning photographer whose work has appeared in over 350 exhibitions in museums and galleries around the world. For the first time, the Recontres dArles festival shows forty original prints by Joel Meyerowitz, combined with a selection of his first black and white and color photographies.

Joel Meyerowitz, Movie Theater Booth, Times Square, New York City, 1963.

Joel Meyerowitz,
Movie Theater Booth, Times Square, New York City, 1963.
Courtesy of the artist and Howard Greenberg Gallery.
COPYRIGHT:Rencontres Arles

Hello Joel, We are delighted to have an interview you, Your exhibition with your early works shows a different Joel Meyerowitz rather than the one we are familiar with. Can you describe your feelings to your work exhibit in Arles? What is your connection to this beautiful city?

First, I love Arles. It’s like a little Paris. It has got a great street life, especially during the festival; great cafes; great weather; the architecture has unique quality; the history of the city is fascinating.
Seeing my work here is a bit problematic to me, because I did not choose these works myself. I gave the director, Sam, the complete freedom to make the show. He went to New York, to the gallery and to my studio and chose the pictures. So he made his own little collection, and I love some of the pictures he chose. Some of them have not been shown before, so the fact that they are a part of his selection makes me happy. I think some of the connections between the pictures are interesting.
What’s difficult for me is getting my bearings, because when I make a show, I call it “a through line”, something that connects one picture to the next so that there is a wave, so that when you leave the show, you would have accumulated a lot of feelings along the way. When you leave I hope you leave with a sense of “Ah! I see the central idea”.
For this show, it’s hard to get the central idea because of the way the pictures exploded on the walls, but the pictures themselves are on a “one to one” basis, are interesting to see, and, most importantly, he did a very courageous thing. I said to him: ”Oh we are going to do a show, I’ll make new prints big, big prints, we’re gonna have some fun, make a dynamic”, and he answered: “No”. He said: “Only you have vintage prints from the dawn of contemporary color in the sixties and seventies”. I think it’s important to educate the viewers to what the color pallet of the sixties looks like, what did film and papers produce and how are they changing as they degrade all the Time.

Not a long time ago, a Gursky was offered for around 60.000 € because of a small color bleaching.
The condition of a few prints of your early works in the exhibition is definitely vintage, and they do lose their colors.
So, what is more important to you, the original Impression of color or the unique Item of the paper?
It’s a balancing act because the work that was made in the sixties and the seventies is the work of that time and we cannot stop the change. It’s as if we want to say: “Oh the daguerreotype from 1845th, they’re not so great looking today, we can make much greater looking prints today, but they have traveled 150 years to get to us today”. When you lift the little cover in the museum, and you look at the daguerreotype, you are in 1845. And you have a sense of wonder: “Oh that how it looks like then, that’s what people saw then”. We are looking at something that is called “fugitive”, it’s leaving us all the time. It’s important to see it for what it was and what it is now.

In an Interview, you once said:
“be invisible!”. With the development of the internet, people are more aware of what happened with the media. Actually, people are moving forward to deny photos of themselves on the street.
In many cases because of fear of the consequences that they might harm them. What is your feeling the change? Do you see any difference in how people react on the streets from then till now?

With the invention of the smartphone, everybody has a camera, they are taking pictures all the time so people are more aware, because they themselves are taking pictures. They are aware of everybody else, and of being in other peoples pictures.
So I don’t know where the balance is because if you are taking pictures and everybody there should be an equality. It’s public life!

In the sixties, no one could imagine, that a guy with a camera would be interested in taking their picture, they ask why? We are coming in the age of celebrities, everybody wants to be famous for 15 mins, the Andy Warhol thing. Everybody is hoping that they can do something that is discovered, make a photograph or a video, show themselves in a certain way, so that they get a million likes and get some money. So there is a commercial aspect to ordinary life, the dream of fame.
The notion of celebrity and instant fame and monetizing our blog, I think unbalancing the social contract. The biggest fear is among parents with their children. If you take a picture of a child, people immediately think you are a pedophile and you gonna put it on the internet and your son or your daughter are going to be an object of sexual attention. I would not say they have irrational fears because things happen. But I think they are excessive and I think in France, for example, there is law about photographing on the street, which if I would be a French citizen, I would fight! Because that means, that someone like Cartier-Bresson could not have made the pictures he made. Because of the laws of today. They are unreasonable, they don’t protect anybody, they only hurt history. To walk on the street is a public place, you are to the public.

You grew up In the Bronx. That needs to be tough, is there a special moment
you remember that is connected with photography?

I was never interested in photography until 1962. I was an artist, I studied art in school, I was painting, I was a graphic designer, art director. Photography, if it plays any role, was when I did a job for graphic design and I had to have a picture and I hired someone to make the picture. That’s how I met Robert Frank.
I grew up with my father, he was a very athletic, physical, curious and playful man. And he loved seeing. When I was a little kid, we went to different places,
and he was saying: “Joel, watch that, look at this, isn’t that fantastic?” He was an uneducated man, he had just a high school graduation, but his feeling about the world was one of joy and play. He was always saying, watch this, and I would look, where he was pointing. And something would happen, somebody would into a wall, someone will fall on a banana peel. It’s like a joke. He was always a split second ahead of the action. So in a way, I grew up with a kind of build in curiosity about the way the world looks, because my pap said that’s beautiful. I can’t say that I went to museums, and I study and composition, nothing. It was just appetite. And appetite is what makes us photographers! You are hungry to see the world every day!

Read the full Interview on Lens Magazine Issue #34 

Joel Meyerowitz Camel Coat Couple in Street Steam, New York City, 1975.

Joel Meyerowitz
Camel Coat Couple in Street Steam, New York City, 1975. Courtesy of the artist and Howard Greenberg Gallery.
COPYRIGHT:Rencontres Arles

 

 

 

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Arles_LensMagazine_SebiBerensPhoto
17 JULY 2017

ARLES 2017 Exhibitions Coverage

ARLES 2017
Exhibitions Coverage by SEBI BERENS

Arles_LensMagazine_SebiBerensPhoto

Rencontres Arles, 2017
COPYRIGHT: Sebi Berens Photo © Lens Magazine

What an opening week! The capital of the Camargue, Arles opened up the “Rencontres d’Arles” 2017. The summer photo festival in the South-East of France takes place since 1970 and presents more than 40 exhibitions in the heart of the city. As the British Journal of Photography stated, the festival remains as one of the “most important photography festivals in the world”.
With the 48th edition of the Rencontres d’Arles, the program has a broad, widespread content. From the 3rd of July until the 24th of September, 250 artists present their work in around 25 sites. The organizer opened up two new sites next to the Boulevard Émile Combes.
By presenting a special place in Colombia, Colombian photographers show up their work, and the visitor gets experiences out of the South American continent. Even a Columbian Party took place after the “Oh!Latina!” opening night on Monday, the third.

Arles_LensMagazine_SebiBerensPhoto

Rencontres Arles, 2017
COPYRIGHT: Sebi Berens Photo © Lens Magazine

For many guests, the main focus has been on the presence of Annie Leibowitz. Among the “Early Year Project, 1970-1983”, that shows the widespread meaning of a photographer’s life, she displayed her work on the Night-Theater alone on stage on Thursday evening and stated out her various experiences of her life as a portraitist of the stars. Divided into eight “Rooms”, the “Early Years, 1970-1983” exhibition gives a deep insight in the life of Annie Leibovitz. It is an experiment to show up around 40-80 pictures of her work in each room, it gives a feeling of what it means to photograph everything you see and what can happen if you carry your camera with you all your life. By working for the Rolling Stone magazine, you can actually go through the history of the VIPs all along that time. As the curator Matthieu Humery stated out, her work can be seen as “an archaeology of the self and a re-examination of history”. All her life she had the chance to go deeply into the life of the celebrities, but she photographed them sincerely and through a personal and a dignified eye.
The Photo Folio Review, inaugurated in 2006, offers portfolio reviews during the opening week. 2016 around 120 professionals analyzed personal portfolios in a one to one discussion and offers the professional’s, photo students and experienced amateur photographers the chance go get a professional opinion about their own work. With Candrowicz Krzysztof, the curator of the Triennial of Photography in Hamburg, Guillaume Fontaine, from the Center Photographique D’Île-De-France to Ruth Eichhorn, an independent curator, that worked as a Director of Photography at the German GEO magazine, the offer of professionals during the review is highly decorated. For the price of 195€, the participants take part on 5 reviews. An amount of money that is not easy to take for everybody, especially in the beginning, but surely effective to their career and finally offers one selected participant the chance to win Le Laurent du Photo Folio Review.
There are a few solo shows by Joel Meyerowitz, Michael Wolf, Gideon Mendel, Alex Majoli and Roger Ballen and are curated and presented in different and individual sites, like churches and renovated apartments.
British photographer Guy Martin shows up with a special project on Turkish realities and fantasies, “The Parallel State”, featured on bp-online this year. By working with different mediums and a real exhibited office of a Turkish-security officer, the project gets its wide feeling of this controversial situation.
On Tuesday the 2017 Book Awards of the festival announced this year’s winner. “Ville de Calais” from Henk Wilfschut won the author book award, Kent Klich received a special mention in the works in Gaza. Also, the winners of the LUMA Recontres Dummy Book Award, Olga Kravets, Maria Morina, Anna Shpakova and Oksana Yushko were announced. The prize is awarded for the best book layout.
Two more exhibitions really had an impressive character. Michael Wolf, an “ex-photojournalist” as Wim van Sinderen introduced him, exhibit his work “Life In The Cities” in the old Church “Eglise Des Freres Precheurs”. The curator Wim van Sinderen worked out a special presentation, that perfectly works with the character of the site. The Retrospective starts with his graduation project about the day to day life of Bottrop in the West-German area. Large prints showing his project the “Architecture of Density” and a “Real Toy Story” installation features over 20.000 plastic “Made in China” toys. The concept shows up “the complexity, the specialty and human body of the modern city life”, van Sinderen states out.

Read the full article on Lens Magazine Issue #34 

 

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Amy Touchette, Interview on Lens Magazine Issue 33
22 JUNE 2017

An Interview with Amy Touchette

An Interview with Amy Touchette
by Catalin CROITORU

Amy Touchette on Lens Magazine Issue 33Hello, Amy Touchette! And thank you for accepting to share your thoughts with LENS MAGAZINE!

My pleasure. Thank you for having me!

You are a reputable photographer from New York City. Your “playground” is the streets of the metropolis. Please tell us how everything started.

Well, it was a pretty dramatic and emotional start, actually. I was working in New York City as a writer, editor, then managing editor and found the more my career progressed in corporate America, the emptier it felt. I remember feeling so depressed about the realization, because I loved writing from an early age, and I thought I was building the life I should. My solution was to not work so much overtime and instead spend more time on a large scale painting series I was working on at home, which was a really soothing experience at the time, a great departure from office life.

Amy Touchette, Interview on Lens Magazine Issue 33

“With Pete,” from Shoot the Arrow:
A Portrait of The World Famous *BOB*
Copyrights to © Amy Touchette. All rights reserved.

But then a few months later, September 11th happened, and everything changed. I was living in the West Village, just a few subway stops from the Twin Towers. Outside was a city I did not recognize. My neighborhood was blocked off from traffic, odors of the most putrid smell of death and destruction constantly wafted in the air, and everywhere were posters with pictures of people’s loved ones they desperately hoped to find—all of whom were dead.

Once I got over the immediate shock of the event, the meaning of life and its gifts were suddenly so clear to me, and it caused me to completely reevaluate my life. Within a month I started taking photography classes, not even knowing what an f-stop was, but having a hunch photographing would offer me the life I desperately sought to have. And I it did. I quit my job after securing some freelance work and slowly started building a life as a photographer. It’s so strange to me that an event so tragic produced one of the best things that ever happened to me, but it did.

Amy Touchette on Lens Magazine Issue 33

“Winter Morning,” from Shoot the Arrow: A Portrait of The World Famous *BOB*
Copyrights to © Amy Touchette. All rights reserved.

What do you feel when you are “on duty,” walking on the sidewalks and spotting your subjects? How do you choose your shooting spots or subjects?

When I’m out with the sole purpose of making pictures, I mostly feel alerted and happy. Walking the streets aimlessly and taking everything in is my favorite thing to do. But as soon as I see someone I want to photograph, I feel nervous and excited, almost like having too much caffeine. There’s definitely always an underlying fear of rejection at that point too, but photography forces me to confront that, which I love.
I’m not sure how to explain who and where I photograph. I know I love photographing in New York City because the population is so diverse and individuality is so expected here. But my reasons for making portraits—why I choose one person over the other—it’s not something I can put my finger on exactly. It starts with an intuition, a feeling of wanting to remember someone, and that’s all I really know about it.

Can you describe what means “a day” for Amy Touchette? Please do a description of it from the morning to the evening/night.

Amy Touchette Interview on Lens Magazine

“G train, Brooklyn, 2016” from Street Dailies
Copyrights to © Amy Touchette. All rights reserved.

I support my fine art photography career largely as a freelance writer. Having no boss or set schedule means that I can keep photography my focus without having to rely on it to make money. So my days are really different from one to the next. This morning I finalized a writing document, then began responding to this interview. At some point in the afternoon my boyfriend will wake up (he’s a musician) so I’ll take a little break then. Later I’ll start framing some prints for a pop-up exhibition I’m having next weekend, go to a yoga class, return home to try to get more work done, make a post on Instagram, and then maybe meet a friend out for a drink. But tomorrow will be totally different, aside from yoga and Instagram, both of which I do almost every day.

I do have a more regular schedule in the summer, though, because that’s when I make a lot of my photography. In New York City, people are so much more open and colorful and accessible during the warmer months, so I concentrate on making work then and looking at the work—editing, sequencing, presenting, marketing, etc.—in the colder months. During summer days, I photograph from 3 pm to sundown every day, if possible, and try to fit everything else in around that. Working with the seasons this way is super relaxing; just being able to focus on certain parts of the process for long periods of time feels healthy and I think I can get deeper as a result, too.

Did you ever happen to have confrontational situations while you were taking pictures on the streets? What happened? How did you solve it?

It’s funny, so many people ask me this question! I understand why, but for the most part, my experience making street photography is far more amiable than it is caustic. Often people like being photographed (as Diane Arbus said, it’s a reasonable amount of attention to pay a person) or they’re unaware they’re being photographed, so 95 percent of the time, I photograph without incident.

That said, I have had a few interactions that have stayed with me, some of which I resolved well and others I failed at miserably. I try not to be too hard on myself when I don’t handle things the best way and just concentrate on receiving the lesson. But when my photographing does make someone angry, it’s because I’m using my iPhone and I didn’t ask permission beforehand. I usually start by telling them I’ll delete the photo if they want, but that I made it because the light was so nice, or they looked so beautiful, or happy, or peaceful—whatever was true for me at the time. This usually disarms them at least a little bit, because most people don’t know what street photography is or why someone would want to photograph a stranger.

I never photograph people who are in an unfair moment (picking their nose, crying, etc.) or who are down and out, so my reason for photographing is always respectful, a celebration of someone to some degree. This helps my case a lot, but some people still feel I’ve invaded their privacy—that I shouldn’t make their picture without their permission. If that happens, I’ll explain why candid moments are special and tell them the last thing I wanted to do was upset them. Throughout the conversation, it helps to restate their opinions so that they feel heard (“I understand you feel such-and-such a way”) and to be calm, and genuine, and friendly, and also articulate and secure about my passion for photography.
These interactions can be really tough, but actually, they’re the conversations I want to have. My camera is not a gun; it’s a piece of equipment I use to see other people and connect with them, even if it’s just for 1/125 of a second. I photograph people because I admire them for one reason or another, and I want to remember them. It’s important to me that I’m able to say that to another human being, that I can muster up the courage to say something that is ultimately so positive and constructive.

Read the full Interview on Lens Magazine Issue #33

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Copyrighted To TARIRO WASHE © All rights reserved
20 JUNE 2017

THE FIGHTING FORCES OF THE TOWER BY TARIRO WASHE

THE FIGHTING FORCES OF THE TOWER
BY TARIRO WASHE

TARIRO WASHE

TARIRO WASHE on Lens Magazine issue 33

Washe acquired a Higher Certificate in Photography at Vega and as National Diploma in Professional Photography at City Varsity, Cape Town, South Africa. In 2014 Washe exhibited in a group exhibition titled ChanceSubjects/ DelibrateObjects at 6 Spin Street Gallery in Cape Town. In 2017, she held her first duo exhibition titled Fighting Forces of the Tower at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe with Steven Chikosi under their collaboration MESO MAVIRI.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE FIGHTING FORCES OF THE TOWER

Copyrighted To TARIRO WASHE © All rights reserved

Fire Instruments As a nation, Zimbabwe requires 25 fire trucks but we currently have 19, of which, only 13 are functional nationwide. A few well-wishers over the years have donated fire trucks to the City of Harare, an endeavor started and lead by the generous Peter Lobel.  Copyrighted To TARIRO WASHE © All rights reserved

These are selected images from an existing body of work called The Fighting Forces of the Tower. This is a duo exhibition, that showcases the brave fighters who are fire guardians of the city of Harare. A common feature in all Harare Fire Stations is the Drill Tower in which they spend much time training and perfecting the art of Fire Fighting.

Copyrighted To TARIRO WASHE © All rights reserved

Women Fighting Fire
Lead Fire Fighter Chirara is one of the very first of two female firefighters in Zimbabwe.
Copyrighted To TARIRO WASHE © All rights reserved

The work explores the question of the need for a greater understanding and solidarity for the firefighter. The Fighting Forces of The Tower not only exhibits the courageous men and women at the Harare Fire Department, it also aims to bring awareness of the challenges the fighters faces and the impact these challenges have on the community at large.

Firefighters live by the definition that bravery is not the absence of fear, but it is knowing what to do in the presence of fear.

Read the full article on Lens Magazine Issue #33

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19 JUNE 2017

LAYERS by Àsìkò

LAYERS
by Àsìkò

 Àsìkò - Layers_ on Lens Magazine issue 33

Àsìkò – Layers_ on Lens Magazine issue 33

Àsìkò is a visual artist who expresses his ideas through the medium of photography and mixed media.
He was born in London, England and spent his formative years in Lagos, Nigeria and adolescent years in London.
His work is constructed in the narrative that straddles between fantasy and reality as a response to his experiences of identity, culture and heritage. His work is layered in light, texture and mood, and is about a conversation on how he sees the world.
His project Layers was featured on the BBC and Huffington Post and exhibited at the South Bank in London. His recent project the Adorned series explores African themes of culture and femininity and was recently exhibited at The Gallery of African Art in London and made up his first solo show at Rele Gallery in Nigeria.
He currently creates works in London and Nigeria.

 

 

 Àsìkò © Lens Magazine

Copyrighted To Àsìkò © All rights reserved

“Layers” is a collection of photographic portraits celebrating the stages of a womanhood. Women from various backgrounds – aged between 19 and 90 years – were photographed in front of an evolving flower wall during a three week period.

Àsìkò on Lens Magazine Issue 33

Copyrighted To Àsìkò © All rights reserved

Layers of freshly picked British flowers were added to the wall as the project
progressed. The added layers symbolize the growth and depth of wisdom women gain as life progresses.

A diverse group of women were selected including a scientist, a team GB gold
medallist, a journalist, a musician, an artist and a writer. The subjects and their life stories are the backbone to the exhibition.
 

 

 

“Layers” is a collaboration between art photographer àsìkò, floral designer Jo Wise and make-up artist Jade Soar.

Read the full article on Lens Magazine Issue #33

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ILONA D.VERESK_Bloom_ on Lens Magazine
18 JUNE 2017

Ilona D.Veresk – Fantasy Dreamy World

Ilona D.Veresk – Fantasy Dreamy World

Ilona D.Veresk on Lens Magazine Issue 33

Ilona D.Veresk on Lens Magazine Issue #33

ILONA D.VERESK , Fashion advertising and fine art photographer based in Moscow.
The start of my career: I was born in Izhevsk (Little city of Russia) in 1993, where I finished art lyceum. When I was 17 years old I moved to Moscow to make my dreams come true. In my deep childhood, I always loved to look at the magazines and pictures in advertising, but I didn’t know what is “being a photographer” and what it can become my profession.
I started my way as a photographer about 3 years from now. Before this, I used to work with painting and matte-paint (creating collages from photos in photoshop combined with digital painting). It was a popular genre for filling cd-covers for music bands. It was an interesting thing and some revenue for that my age. However, now I prefer to create real decorations, I dress up my models with handmade props sometimes, as in the start of my photographic career. Most of the photographers started to study from shooting people who are familiar with yourself, I’m not an exception. My first models were my friends.
However, photography is a full-time job for me now.

 

ILONA D.VERESK_Bloom_ on Lens Magazine

Copyrighted To ILONA D.VERESK © All rights reserved

 ILONA D.VERESK on Lens Magazine

Copyrighted To ILONA D.VERESK © All rights reserved

 

“My path and inspiration: I started as a freelancer when I was 16 years old, it became a great experience for further life. Closer to my 18 years I started to travel to Russian cities and finally stopped in Moscow. This city inspires me, after all, boring things I saw before. However, I’m missing the nature, I’d love to see more beautiful places here: like wild forests under my window or small nice rivers and lakes, or giant fields, but I see gray boxes of houses around me. This way nature becomes my lead-motive in art. Surely, myths and fairy tales are a great pantry of inspiration too, but I’m not interested in the exact illustrations of dusty stories, it’s boring. I’m trying to mix my life experience with my vision and dreams. The introduction of modern elements, artificial and natural things, mixing different styles and concepts gives more freedom.”

 

 

 

Read the full article on Lens Magazine Issue #33

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Nina Pak on Lens Magazine Issue 33
17 JUNE 2017

NINA PAK

NINA PAK

Nina Pak on Lens Magazine issue 33

Nina Pak on Lens Magazine issue 33

Nina Pak has more than 30 years experience as a professional photographer, starting with film and then digital media. She is also a wardrobe stylist, set designer and hair stylist. These skills developed out of necessity, and are credited to Dreamloka.
Nina has had the pleasure of working with many gifted designers in recent years, preferring the Avant-Garde’ and wearable art. A wardrobe that touches on the world of fantasy and the surreal.
She has been working with Photoshop since it first came on the market, with years of experience in digital retouching and photo manipulation, she loves to create fantasy imagery using costumes, accessories and props, building sets or adding backgrounds post production.
Over the last decade, her focus has been with fashion editorial work, she has been published internationally in magazines, on book covers and in various anthologies and photography books.
Nina’s inspiration comes from her dreams, she strives to make them tangible with her art. She is also influenced by what she reads, which is often delving into the fantasy and science fiction worlds of some of her favorite authors. She also loves mysteries, mythology, fairytales, and ancient history.

Nina Pak on Lens Magazine issue 33

Designer: April Peters of the House Gallery Boutique, Model: Anisa Salmi, Makeup: Donika Rudari, Hair: Dreamloka
Copyrighted to Nina Pak © All rights reserved.

The underwater fashion work is a recent development since 2012, this environment makes magical images possible, however, it is not in the least bit simple to create this kind of photo. Capturing a few usable frames is by far more difficult than any other sort of photographic work, these enchanting poses are not effortless, they are very demanding, even painful. The models who can move with ease in this subaqueous environment appearing calm and graceful, are truly exceptional. And of course taking the images is only the beginning, as with all of Nina’s creative work, she spends hours perfecting them with post production techniques. The end result is alluring, delicate, in some cases eerie, they all have a mysterious story to tell.
Building a team is something Nina does for every shoot. Availability often dictates who takes part in each of her creative shoots, but all of the makeup artists, hair stylists, and designers she has worked with over the years share her commitment to create something unique and exceptional, something wonderful they can be proud to be a part of.

Read the full article on Lens Magazine Issue #33

 

 

 

Nina Pak on Lens Magazine Issue 33

Clothing Designer: April Peters of The House Gallery Boutique, Model: Britt Schafer, Makeup: Artist Jennifer little
Copyrighted to Nina Pak © All rights reserved.

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